Survey: Many Americans are not storm ready

In 2013, the Federal Emergency Management Agency made 95 major disaster and fire declarations across the country. This is nearly double the number of disaster declarations made only two decades ago.

At the beginning of the 2014 hurricane season, the question now is – what are people doing to prepare themselves and protect their families from the next disaster?

A new survey commissioned by Allstate investigated American’s attitudes, opinions and experiences with natural disasters and found that 92 percent of Americans have experienced natural disasters and the damage caused by them. Yet too many people – nearly a third (30 percent) – say they would take their chances if another severe storm was approaching and wait until it’s absolutely necessary to evacuate to a safe place. While many people (41 percent) say they have discussed a general evacuation plan, only eight percent have actually practiced a plan of escape.

When it comes to having an emergency kit filled with supplies, important papers, medications and non-perishable food, half of Americans say they have a kit ready to go when they need to evacuate. That’s up 38 percent from Allstate’s first disaster-preparedness survey in May, 2012. However, there’s been no increase in the number of Americans who have put together a home inventory list of their belongings.

Mark McGillivray, Senior Vice President of Claims, joined The Rhode Show to talk about the new survey, provide safety-preparedness tips for consumers and speak to how Allstate’s National Catastrophe Team responds to disasters.

In the video, Mark discusses: 

  • The Survey: What actions Americans have taken after high-profile disasters like Katrina, Sandy, and the Joplin tornadoes
  • Local Statistics: The most prevalent types of disasters that occur in your area
  • Safety & Preparation Tips for Consumers: Simple steps to prepare your family for a disaster
  • Creating a Home Inventory: The latest digital tools available to help manage losses in the wake of a disaster

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