Providence officer terminated after guilty pleas on threat, gun charges

Scott Logan remains locked up, awaiting trial in three separate incidents.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WPRI) — Veteran Providence Police Officer Scott Logan was terminated from the force Thursday morning after waiving his right to a trial in two separate cases and pleading guilty to threatening a superior officer and gun charges.

Public Safety Commissioner Steven Pare said Logan was “effectively terminated” after pleading guilty to the felonies.

Logan, 46, was handcuffed and remanded into custody following the hearing at Providence Superior Court. He was sentenced to five years, including four years probation and one year home confinement. Logan has already served 150 days of his home confinement.

A misdemeanor cyberstalking charge involving Logan allegedly threatening to snap his doctor’s neck like a turkey bone was dismissed.

Logan’s attorney John Lynch said his client is “devastated by this whole thing.”

“He saw his life spiral out of control over the last year,” said Lynch. “He’s very sorry and contrite. He realizes that he put himself in a horrible position and he accepts responsibility for his actions.”

Logan was indicted last August on one count of altering marks of identification on a firearm about a month after a Colt .380 with an unreadable serial number was found in his bag. Logan told Providence police that his ex-girlfriend gave him the gun to turn into police, but he said he forgot to do that. Logan said he probably drove off after leaving the bag on his police car. The bag was turned into central station by a civilian.

In October, Logan was charged with three counts of threats to public officials in connection with what police alleged were threatening text messages to superior officers. According to the arrest warrant affidavit, Logan named a total of five officers in the texts that he sent to a patrolman who then reported the incident to the officers mentioned in the texts.

Two of those counts were dropped in exchange for Logan’s guilty plea on the third count.

Lynch said Logan’s issues were exacerbated by the prescription drug Adderall, which he said made the former officer paranoid and “more likely to make statements that he otherwise wouldn’t have made.”

The affidavit states Logan texted, “you don’t know the aggravation and damage they have to my life (sic) they will pay.” That line was followed by the names of the three officers he’s accused of threatening.

Among the other statements in the four paragraphs of messages, Logan states twice that “they’re on my hit list” and also texted “they better watch for her (expletive) families.”

Lynch said Logan wanted to write letters to apologize to the three officers who he threatened, but that would have violated a no-contact order imposed by the court.

The Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights will not apply to Logan since he is now a felon.

Lynch said Logan was about five months short of 20 years on the police force, so according to Lynch, the former officer is not eligible for his pension.

“I’m hoping that [the pension board] will allow him to collect the amount of money he put in [to the system,]” Lynch said.

Julianne Peixoto and Target 12 Investigator Walt Buteau contributed to this report. Send tips to Walt at wbuteau@wpri.com and follow him on Twitter @wbuteau

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