The importance of the mid-year school check in

With the school routine in full swing now is great time to review what’s working and not working with your child.

Brent from The Children’s Workshop gives us some advice about a mid- year check in.

With fall sports or activities coming to an end, it is the perfect time to see if there is a change in the schedule that will help your child succeed more in school.

There are a few things that parents can do if they find that what has been going on so far just isn’t working for their child.

Now is a great time to make any sort of changes because there is still a lot of time left in the school year for them to turn things around.

Here are a few options to try out:

  • Attend parent/teacher conferences or reach out to their classroom teacher: nobody can tell you better what your child is doing well or maybe struggling with than their teacher. They will help you identify an area that they may be struggling with and changes that can help them.
  • Visit the school website: Know what is coming next. Are there important testing dates coming up? Is there a class trip or event coming up that you were unaware of? This will help you know what’s coming next, so that you can adjust schedules accordingly. Many teachers maintain their own class websites or social media accounts with important homework information, tips, and contact info.
  • Change up the homework routine: If you have been giving your child some time after school to play outside and when they come in, focusing on homework becomes a challenge, have them do the homework right after school instead. They may still be in school focus mode and more willing to work on their homework right away. Since it is getting darker earlier, have them play outside and burn off that energy, eat dinner a little earlier, and then have them refocus, sit, and do their homework.
  • Set them up to succeed: change up the small things. Instead of relying on them to eat breakfast at school, try having them eat at home before they leave. Breakfast is a very important meal to start the day, and when they get to school, they are too busy playing with friends to eat at school. Try to teach them to be a little more organized; keeping a neat desk will allow them to find what they need quickly, avoiding the frustration they feel before even working on the tasks in front of them. If they are struggling to get started on tasks when they get home from school, try a list that they can cross off when they complete the task. For example: write out, “Have snack, do your homework, go to soccer practice.” This will help them know what order things will happen that day.
  • Get Involved: A child who feels detached from his or her classroom may see you coming in to volunteer as a positive, and help them really connect back to the classroom. Chaperone a field trip, or come in and read to the class. Teachers are always looking for ways to get parents involved. If your child is having a behavioral problem at school, seeing you involved in the room may help.

It is never too late to switch things up and help your child succeed in school. If they attend an after-school program, speak to those teachers as well. They may be able to suggest something they can do in their program that will help. Every child can succeed given the right tools, and these tips will hopefully get everyone back on track!



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