Staying Safe the Sudden Surge of Summer Heat

Even if you are loving the sudden switch to summer heat after a chilly start to May… it may be too much too soon for your body.

WE’RE NOT USED TO IT:

You may have noticed it yesterday… those 80s sure felt hot! And today is even hotter.  In fact, it’s the first 90F day in more than 8 months.

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), it typically takes humans about 5-7 days to adjust to the heat. Our sudden switch from highs in the 50s to a stretch in the 80s and 90s doesn’t give much time for people working and exercising outdoors to acclimate.  Experts say that on the first day of work in a hot environment, the body temperature, pulse rate and general discomfort will be higher.

People with diabetes, kidney and heart problems, pregnancy and those who are overweight are more prone to heat-related illnesses.

AIR QUALITY ALERT


High ground level ozone concentrations are leading to what the DEM considers unhealthy air.  The Department of Health warns that throat irritation, coughing, chest pain, shortness of breath and increased susceptibility respiratory ailments are possible on days like today.

HOW TO STAY SAFE:

  • LIMIT Outdoor exercise and strenuous activity
  • STAY in air-conditions environments
  • EXERCISE in the morning
  • DRINK plenty of water
  • TAKE frequent breaks
  • WORK in the shade if possible
  • WEAR light colored, loose fitting clothing

 

HITTING THE BEACH/BAY

Certainly the coastline is the place to go to beat the heat.  But use extra caution boating/swimming in the water.  Water temperatures at the shore are running around 50F, and are in the low 50s in the bay.  These are temperatures cold enough to cause hypothermia:

 

Courtesy: biosynchronistics.com

 

 

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