Monday’s Solar Eclipse: What You Need To Know

 

From Chief Meteorologist Tony Petrarca

Excitement is building as we get close to the a solar eclipse on Monday August 21st.  In this blog we will cover the following…

  1. What is a solar eclipse
  2. How to view it safely
  3. What will it look like here in southern New England
  4. Weather forecast Monday…will it be clear?

WHAT IS A SOLAR ECLIPSE:

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon appears to cover the disk of the sun.  The moon will will pass between the sun and earth and will block all or part of the sun. Some locations in the United States will see complete coverage of the sun (total solar eclipse), while other locations, including southern New England get “partial coverage”. Infact,  everyone in North America will have an opportunity to see it.

In a “total” solar eclipse, the moon covers entire disk of the sun, with the just the outer glow of the sun’s atmosphere glowing.  With partial coverage, a small slice of the sun will still be visible. Coverage in our area will be about 65 %

A partial shadow is called the PENUMBRA

A full shadow is called  the UMBRA

The path across the United States that will experience total coverage will be a thin swath about 70 miles wide, and will cross from west to east from Oregon to South Carolina.

Here is a photo of a “total” eclipse

A partial eclipse looks like  this...

WHAT WILL WE SEE IN OUR AREA MONDAY

1:28 pm Mon, Aug 21

Partial Eclipse begins The Moon touches the Sun’s edge.

2:47 pm Mon, Aug 21

Maximum Eclipse Moon is closest to the center of the Sun.

The event ends at 4:00pm

HOW TO VIEW SAFELY

Of course you don’t want to look directly at the sun without protection, and that includes during an eclipse too. There are two safe ways to view.. either directly or indirectly.  Direct viewing requires a specific filtering eyeglass lens (common everyday sunglasses not recommended). Indirect viewing is accomplished by projecting an image onto a screen. Click HERE for more details on how to do this.

WILL THE WEATHER COOPERATE?

Right now the answer is “yes”.  Latest data still points to a mostly sunny dry day with very little in the way of cloud cover

Historic Eclipse: Places to watch in Southern New England..Click HERE For Additional Information from WPRI .com

 

 

 

 

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